My insight for U.S. Manufacturing in 2015-2016 - Peter Jonathan Wilcheck
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//My insight for U.S. Manufacturing in 2015-2016

My insight for U.S. Manufacturing in 2015-2016

What’s the difference between partly cloudy and partly sunny? Is it a glass half-full/half-empty question? Does it depend on where you’re standing – specifically, whether you’re here or “over there?”

Bill Conerly in Forbes magazine recently laid out his 2015-2016 predictions for manufacturing in the United States, focusing mainly on the outlook for continued export of production overseas and the potential for more production returning home. Overall, Conerly’s forecast for growth in manufacturing is positive.

But predicting the future is never an exact science, and while growth may be on the horizon, the question of where it will take place depends on many changeable factors – labor and freight costs as well as the great intangibles – political change, innovation, and even, yes, the weather.

On the up side? Offshoring and reshoring have reached a kind of equilibrium. While some companies may still find financial advantage to moving offshore, Conerly implies that the wave has crested and that some manufacturers will see benefit in returning to the U.S., either because of changed conditions here or because the original benefits of moving overseas have flattened out.

And with productivity generally on the rise in the U.S., manufacturing production can be expected to rise with it. Conerly won’t go so far as to say it’s beach weather, but he does seem to think the recent manufacturing polar vortex is (at least for now) behind us.

Conerly predicts that some manufacturing will return to the U.S., but that it’s not likely to bring many jobs with it. Whatever production returns to these shores will likely be due to the fact that it can be accomplished with limited amounts of labor.

On the whole, I believe in

What’s the difference between partly cloudy and partly sunny? Is it a glass half-full/half-empty question? Does it depend on where you’re standing – specifically, whether you’re here or “over there?”

Bill Conerly in Forbes magazine recently laid out his 2015-2016 predictions for manufacturing in the United States, focusing mainly on the outlook for continued export of production overseas and the potential for more production returning home. Overall, Conerly’s forecast for growth in manufacturing is positive.

But predicting the future is never an exact science, and while growth may be on the horizon, the question of where it will take place depends on many changeable factors – labor and freight costs as well as the great intangibles – political change, innovation, and even, yes, the weather.

On the up side? Offshoring and reshoring have reached a kind of equilibrium. While some companies may still find financial advantage to moving offshore, Conerly implies that the wave has crested and that some manufacturers will see benefit in returning to the U.S., either because of changed conditions here or because the original benefits of moving overseas have flattened out.

And with productivity generally on the rise in the U.S., manufacturing production can be expected to rise with it. Conerly won’t go so far as to say it’s beach weather, but he does seem to think the recent manufacturing polar vortex is (at least for now) behind us.

Conerly predicts that some manufacturing will return to the U.S., but that it’s not likely to bring many jobs with it. Whatever production returns to these shores will likely be due to the fact that it can be accomplished with limited amounts of labor. On the whole, Conerly’s outlook for tomorrow reads a lot like partly sunny but with a prudent admonition to make sure you don’t leave your umbrella at home.

Conerly’s outlook for tomorrow reads a lot like partly sunny but with a prudent admonition to make sure you don’t leave your umbrella at home.

Photo image by www.businessinsider.com

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